Mens Temporum . UK

Mens Temporum in Latin means "Mind of Times",
but the word mens can signify much more than simply "mind".

The Story So Far

This is a personal site originally created to record a particular personal experience, which has lasted some six years so far. However, towards the end of that period I decided that it was inappropriate to continue to make all the details public, so now only this relatively brief summary remains.

The name Mens Temporum comes from a draft novel that I wrote in 2011. Most of its few readers have regarded it as science fiction and there was a time that I would have too, but maybe no longer. Exactly what Mens Temporum was in the story was never clear, but in essence it somehow provided a means to pass information backwards in time. Apart from within research into the paranormal, such a real possibility is not entertained much in conventional human culture. Regardless of its possibility, it would pose too much of a threat to that culture. Our lives are based on strictly chronological causes and effects and anything running counter to this idea would seriously erode our society. Hence I think it wise only to provide this summary of my experiences to give just a hint of them, but not enough detail to disturb any conventional perceptions.

If it were possible to pass information backwards in time then that would raise serious questions about the nature of fate and free will. We assume that the future is not yet formed, so our fate is, within limits, our own to choose. However, if everything that happens is caused by previous events and nothing can simply happen arbitrarily, then this suggests that free will is an illusion and our fate is already determined by the past. Apparently even an unformed future does not give us any more freedom at all, if one follows that strict scientific view of the universe. That doesn’t seem to leave much room for the human spirit, the soul so to speak, but science doesn’t cater for the existence of the soul either. Even if it were possible just subconsciously to pass information backwards in time within the brain, this could have remarkable effects. It would enable the brain to work anachronistically, processing thoughts after acting on them. This may explain why the brain seems so extraordinarily powerful and yet needs regular periods of sleep, the absence of consciousness, to recuperate. Personally I have often found it more effective to tell someone my solution to a problem before working out exactly why it is the solution. It gives an impression of greater intelligence, provided that one genuinely feels that it is right, that “sixth sense” apparently kicking in. Also many of us have had occasion to remark, “I must be psychic,” without giving it any serious thought simply because the idea is not taken seriously.

Unsurprisingly my own experiences with this phenomenon have led me to consider the issues of fate and free will in a very personal context. I am currently in my seventies, so fate is becoming a regular companion anyway and I can be coldly analytical and philosophical about it. As for free will, being retired, apparently healthy, adequately wealthy and sufficiently wise, I have plenty of that, should it actually exist and not be an illusion. So, now to the details.

I have never had any ambitions to be a writer, so that novel came as a surprise in itself. Chronologically my writing career was as follows, not that chronology matters much where reverse causation may be an influence. Once upon a time, exactly when I can’t remember, I awoke one morning with an apparently original children’s story screaming at me in my mind. I had no idea why as I had no children to tell it to and no use for such a thing. Disregarding the actual content, it seemed to be an encouragement to children not to fear their dreams but see them as opportunities to explore the realms of their own imagination. I did nothing with the story but it continued to buzz noisily around in my head for months, years even, like a bluebottle unable to find its way out of a bathroom.

During my working life I developed computer software. This entails holding much complex information in mind until it is safely consigned to files within a computer and can be forgotten. Maybe that story stayed in my mind for that reason, that I had not passed it on to another destination. Therefore when in 2009 another story similarly materialised in my mind while I was trying to concentrate on getting a software project finished, I immediately decided to document it to purge it from my thoughts. This story was far more mature, science fiction about a detective who was given strange cases where the background information never matched up to reality. Eventually, during the eleventh such case, he witnesses reality change before his eyes as though someone has changed the past history of a man’s life. The man explains to him that somehow he was in contact with people in the past who did this for him. Being no fiction writer I simply documented the story in the only way I knew, as a letter from the detective to the solicitors employing him for undisclosed clients. I had written plenty of letters to solicitors, so this came easily to me. I filed the letter in my computer and did nothing more with it.

Unknown to me that letter already contained clues to what lay ahead. I arbitrarily named the detective “David Enstrum”, but the unusual name “Enstrum” is itself contained within “Mens Temporum” if some of the letters are removed. The man who was transported back in time to influence the past I named “Marcus” and in early 2011 while writing my novel I encountered the only man with that name that I know of when he sat on the other side of a railway carriage from me and said into his phone, “This is Marcus. I have some copy to get in by eleven.” Even that number eleven was mentioned and he was evidently a writer. I have no idea when my strange experiences really started to appear but now on reflection suspect that they have been around all of my life and I was simply indoctrinated by society not to see them for what they were.

In 2010, having given up the voluntary work that had kept me busy during my retirement so far, I looked into the feasibility of building a replica of a 1960’s mainframe computer. That project is now documented on another website of mine, honeypi.org.uk. One thing hampering me in particular was that I did not have the right entirely obsolete magnetic core memories for the task. I had a few that could theoretically be adapted to the purpose, but it would take a lot of work and not be ideal. I shelved the project wishing that I might find the right memories somewhere in the future. Maybe I shouldn’t have made such a wish. Traditionally wishes in fairy tales always get taken the wrong way by some playful genie and my mind has always been very playful.

To fill my time I subsequently resumed my search for my family origins, my grandfather having appeared out of nowhere in London in the late nineteenth century. To this end I contacted a researcher at the US National Archives in Washington DC. He turned out to be a university lecturer in English literature and an Anglophile as well, so eventually after much casual correspondence I mentioned my solitary short story to him and he asked to read it. He said that he saw possibilities for expanding the story into something far more ambitious and that was when the novel materialised just as the previous stories had, virtually overnight, or at least a series of nights.

Despite my inexperience I had no trouble writing the whole thing, as though I was simply taking dictation from the real author elsewhere. I had no idea where it was coming from or even what it really meant, but eventually had a draft written, which I gave the title “Never Upon A Time (about something else)”. I added those words after the title as I was sure that it wasn’t what it appeared to be but embodied some other message. I tried for years after to work out how and why I had written it and started to notice that it seemed to contain details that indirectly related to events that occurred in my life after finishing it. It even seemed to refer to my finding those computer memories that I needed, which happened in reality as a result of my contacting a lady named Els in Amsterdam. Her name was typical of the fiendish coincidences that plagued me during those years. As though to taunt me about such coincidences I also discovered that someone else had registered a website name very similar to mine, “honeypi.co.uk” to be precise, and he even had the same name as me! His intentions turned out to be quite legitimate and he was as surprised as I was about this ludicrous coincidence. It didn’t appear to be connected to my novel in any way though.

In the later part of my novel two people’s minds became connected across six years in time, enabling information to be passed back over this period. Taking this to be literally significant I expected events in 2017 to have a noticeable bearing on the novel as others had before, although I suspected that the two minds involved were in reality both my own. By then I had documented many of my experiences and speculations on this website, but by the middle of 2017 I felt that they had got far too convincing, so closed the whole site, leaving just this summary.

I have never had any interest in the paranormal and still don’t. From my research as a layman in the last six years I have come to the conclusion that there is insufficient knowledge around at present to refute the possibility of the time barrier being broken in a limited way. I suspect that the scientific explanation lies in the as yet unexplored domain of quantum neuroscience but, whether it does or not, my personal experiences, many documented in contemporary timestamped and verifiable computer media, cannot be refuted although their interpretation arguably can.

So long as busy career-minded psychologists persist in interpreting the behaviour of the human mind solely within the strictly chronological conventions of society it seems unlikely that the existence of the Mens Temporum phenomenon will be investigated properly. As for the scientific community, they have only had a few hundred years to come to their conclusions, while neurons have had over six hundred million years to develop their strategies for survival. These may well include a way of sensing future events, that being on balance an advantage even if it is not reliable and predictable enough for scientists, which neurons invented much later just as an afterthought. Personally I am more inclined to trust my neurons, possibly the most complex organisms known to mankind. In fact without their assistance we wouldn’t know anything.

Joking apart, if you seriously wish to discuss this subject further with me then email “scriptor” at this site, but bear in mind that I have no interest in wider paranormal phenomena or speculation and indeed only regard this one as preternatural, to use an older more appropriate word. Perhaps before you do so you should ask yourself what your intentions are though. In my experience just having intentions can itself change the future, or maybe even the past. By the way, my name is Rob.